Safe at Home

Are you secure in your home? Is your home secure? Is there a difference?

When I was young, I was afraid of every shadow and dark corner of the house. When I became a “Latch key kid”, my anxiety of being alone was unbearable. Even though I locked the door behind my mother as she left for work, I did not feel safe. I felt like the house got extra quiet when my mother left; except for the eerie creek in a vacant room or a noise at the window. During the warmer months I would sit at the bus stop and wait for hours for the bus to come. When It was cold or raining, I would sit in the doorway and watch the bus coming from the next street over.

At that time, we lived in a double wide trailer. It was in a nice neighborhood and I don’t recall anyone ever being robbed. We played outside in the street, and we travelled up and down several blocks with no hassle. In my opinion, my house was safe. The issue was I did not feel safe when I was alone in the house.

My first attempt to move away from home, I had two part-time jobs, I was strong-willed and independent. I was overconfident in my masculine abilities and I paid the price for it. The eye-opening incident occurred because I seldom locked my doors to my trailer (different neighborhood). On some hot Georgia nights, I left the door open, letting the night breeze blow through the screen door. One night three or four men came into the house and assaulted me, while my roommate was at work. The assailants barely spoke, as I recall; and they didn’t really take anything. That is not a true statement, those men took my feeling of safety. It took years, for that feeling of dread and fear to morph into a health fear I can use to my advantage.

There is a saying that I keep in the back of my mind, “Locks are a deterrent”. It means that if someone really wants to get in a locked door, they will. I choose to think of locks a little differently. My locks are not to keep you out, they are there to keep you safe. As long as the trouble and mayhem stay outside, I am fine. When trouble comes inside, then I am responsible for keeping my family safe.

California just passed another law on guns. This law says you must keep your guns locked in your house. If someone breaks in your house while you are home, you have to tell them o hold on until you unlock your gun to defend yourself.

Solutions: There are more ways to defend yourself than the use of a gun. The better the door, the lock and the locking mechanism, the better the deterrent. Security alarms that signal when a window or door is open is a great deterrent. Pets make a great deterrent. It doesn’t have to be a big dog. Little yappy dogs make good alarms. I once had a cat that would attack strangers. I would have to slowly bring people in, give them a treat to give the cat. If the cat approved of you, it would hang out. If the cat didn’t like you, it would hide. If you came in the house unannounced or tried to bring the cat out of hiding – there would be blood.

Side note: Not every gun is the same -regardless of California’s thought process. Some bullets have the capability to go through walls and cause great damage to people and property. Do your research and choose wisely. When you have decided on a choice of bullet and gun, go talk to an expert (not the guy just trying to sell you a gun). Take classes on gun safety. Talk it over with the people who share the house that the gun will be brought into. Think it over again, then make a purchase.

If you want to learn more contact me and schedule a seminar.

Let’s talk about it.

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